<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote"><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">
<br>
1) The US does have a privileged position with ICANN. This is the result<br>
of history. The US invented the Internet and has driven much of its<br>
development. The US has not really done very much to influence ICANN&#39;s<br>
work, when it could have done more.<br></blockquote><div><br></div><div>If you do some research about the history of the Internet you will find out that this is certainly not 100% true, so being point #1 does not give too much credit to the rest.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Internet Governance does not stand for &quot;governing&quot; the Internet, and this is one of the interpretations that generates all sorts of conflicts, particularly when the term gets translated to other languages such as Spanish.</div>
<div><br></div><div>While not universally accepted, and still under discussion how to interpret it, out of WSIS 2005 there was some agreement on a &quot;working&quot; definition that says:</div><div><br></div><div>&quot;Internet governance is the development and application by Governments, the private sector and civil society, in their respective roles, of shared principles, norms, rules, decision-making procedures, and programmes that shape the evolution and use of the Internet.&quot;<br>
</div><div><br></div><div>You can find this type of information on the WSIS report, multiple documents generated by IGF, and introductory books and papers about IG from Diplo.</div><div><br></div><div>Regards</div><div>Jorge</div>
<div><br></div></div></div></div>