<div dir="ltr"><br><div class="gmail_extra"><br><br><div class="gmail_quote">On Mon, Dec 9, 2013 at 11:46 AM, Nigel Hickson <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:nigel.hickson@icann.org" target="_blank">nigel.hickson@icann.org</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex">Milton<br>
<br>
As ever you have hit the right note; as civil servants we sometimes<br>
welcomed &quot;leaks&quot; (shock, horror) as the feedback enabled us to produce a<br>
more rounded and thoughtful product. But conversely the rhetoric can be<br>
unhelpful if folks take a leak as formal policyŠ.<br>
<br>
Best</blockquote><div><br></div><div>And there is always the game of managing expectations by leaking something that suggests cutting public pensions by 80% so that the final proposal of 5% looks like a major concession.</div>
<div><br></div><div>It would not surprise me if we someday discovered that the recent &#39;leak&#39; of the US negotiating position in the Pacific Partnership Treaty turns out to have been the US intentionally sabotaging its own position. They can now tell their corporate backers that they did their best but were unable to get what they wanted for them.</div>
</div><div><br></div><div>Until we have the actual document rather than excerpts, I would not want to come to any conclusions at all. I am exceptionally reluctant to accept any paper that is based on concealed evidence. The partial leak is very much like using excerpts from a preprint of a scientific paper to &#39;prove&#39; that something must be done. </div>
<div><br></div>-- <br>Website: <a href="http://hallambaker.com/">http://hallambaker.com/</a><br>
</div></div>