<html>
<body>
<a href="http://intlnet.org/wiki/20131202_-_The_need_for_a_%221net-neutrality_charter%22" eudora="autourl">
http://intlnet.org/wiki/20131202_-_The_need_for_a_%221net-neutrality_charter%22<br>
<br>
</a><blockquote type=cite class=cite cite=""><b>At 08:03 27/11/2013, Seun
Ojedeji wrote:</b><br>
The meeting will aim to produce universal internet principles and an
institutional framework for multistakeholder internet governance. The
framework will include a roadmap to evolve and globalize current
institutions, and new mechanisms to address the emerging internet
governance topics.</blockquote><b><br><br>
</b>Sorry, but this is the thinking BUG again.<br><br>
A principle is something basic that you base your thinking upon to
produce a result. This is, therefore, not something you can produce,
especially if it is universal.<br><br>
All you can do is:<br>
* either identify the principles - and they will remain in place
forever.<br>
* or make believe that what pleases you is a principle – and you will be
challenged by competition and/or reality.<br><br>
<br>
<b>1. to identify principles<br><br>
</b>This is the proper way of dealing with reality. The internet
architecture is based upon a few architectonical principles:<br>
* robustness (RFC 1122)<br>
* permanent change, end to end transport, the rest at the fringe (RFC
1958)<br>
* simplicity (RFC 3439)<br>
* subsidiarity (illustrated by RFC 5895).<br>
&nbsp;<br>
NB1: All of them are constrained by the 1972 BUG (Banning Uses on a
Global scale that cannot be controlled) by NSA/Jon
Postel/I*society.<br><br>
NB2: “code is law” is an example of societal architectonic principle
identified by Dr. Lessig.<br><br>
<br>
<b>2. to make believe that what pleases you is a principle.</b> <br><br>
This is creating your own virtuality. Virtuality is when you are
parametering principles. The parameter set is called a paradigm.<br><br>
What we understand now from the 1NET ISOC led consistency effort is a
well-designed plan (by Lynn St Amour or to her initiative?):<br><br>
1. to establish a new normative paradigm where the goal is no longer to
make the internet work better for all, but rather to be sold better&nbsp;
(OpenStand/RFC 6852)<br><br>
2. then to publish as a substantial progress their agreement to strive
for a unique Peer and&nbsp; Peer mechanism for their closed
multistakeholder cooperation, i.e. a radical monopoly on the
internet.<br><br>
3. to use the well timed supposed USG Snowden weakness to consolidate
their international intergovernance and technological constraints dubbed
&quot;globalization&quot; (we know the meaning from the
localization/internationalization process and RFC 3935’s choice of the
English language).<br><br>
4. the next step will be to label, fight, and condemn intelligent global
users as &quot;net pirates&quot; (as the Majors do which only are music
transporters, the sale as I* coalesced members are in the data transport
business) <br><br>
5. This is in order to build and manage created scarcities (e.g. IPv6
against LISP) to get a larger and stable share (status-quo) of the&nbsp;
&quot;huge bounty&quot; (RFC 6852) that they have &quot;created&quot; and
to better control the users’ crowd (NSA and big data). Let us remember
the danger that data leaks may represent (eg. Wikileaks) and the cost of
data evasion (lack of control on key data masses). Network security is
two faced – the individual privacy vs. the collective protection. How can
algorithmic governance properly work if some of the determining data are
subtracted from the considered panels? <br><br>
Something is however wrong in this logic: music, data, and names do not
belong to governments, majors, I* or ICANN. They belong to the people who
created them, i.e. us. The &quot;IP&quot; they take care of is the
Internet Protocol, not our Intellectual property. This is why an
intergovernance is something too complex to be handled by an occasional
steering comity whatever the competence and good-will of its
circumstantial members.<br><br>
<br>
<b>3. the conflict that has been created<br>
</b><i>(cf. Noam Chomsky manipulation strategy # 2).<br><br>
</i>I certainly understand that assuming a government responsibility or
being in the money making business with heavy, structural long-term
investments to support, the ISOC sponsors, members, and allied would
prefer a single unified (one) 1NET network of networks under their
commonly concerted control. <br><br>
However, as&nbsp; a user, I want;<br>
(1) an &quot;n-net&quot; technology and delivery competition toward a
&quot;neutral net&quot;, <br>
(2) in order to obtain a 0net (zero) impact quality, so my distributed
applications and programming behave as if they&nbsp; used the neutral
&quot;n-nets of the nets of the nets&quot;.<br><br>
This seems totally conflicting. May be not.<br><br>
a. the I* constrained proposition of the Internet BUG does not
technically, operationally, economically, politically, and commercially
scale. I* CEOs know or are beginning to feel it: this is why they started
thinking together, the same as the WCIT Govs are doing<br><br>
b. as users we certainly do not oppose any of them: we only want that
they stay inside of their end to end area. This is why, at this stage, my
trust in the 1NET process can only be based upon one still missing
document: the &quot;1NET-neutrality charter&quot; (the same as I call for
the ITU-neutrality one).&nbsp; This document will also have to convince
me technically in terms of cross-technology neutrality: speaking of
“balkanization” only means that the internet is not architectonically
neutral. It MUST (and actually can be neutrally used whatever the
technology, once “The network BUG” is disregarded).<br>
&nbsp;<br>
&nbsp;<br>
<b>4. Who is to publish it?</b> <br>
&nbsp;<br>
We are simultaneously told a few things.<br>
&nbsp;<br>
1.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
<x-tab>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</x-tab>That the I* CEO
meetings were facilitated by Lynn St Amour.<br>
2.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
<x-tab>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</x-tab>That they did
not always gather the same attendees.<br>
3.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
<x-tab>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</x-tab>That the
Montevideo Statement and the proposed meeting were being discussed
widely, but they were also conflated and perceived as part of a single
plan, whereas in fact they were conceived quite independently (Paul
Wilson).<br>
&nbsp;4.&nbsp; <x-tab>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</x-tab>That&nbsp; the target is
a top/bottom-up auto-catalytic attempt that is genuinely (John Curan)
attempting two errors: (1) to attract “bottoms” when what they should
dialog with “extensions”, (2) they want an MS relationship limited to
their own networking group (as in 1972) and sit a steering comity instead
of a facilitating secretariat. <br><br>
&nbsp;<br>
In a nutshell, the I* CEOs/leaders do not form a single block. Their
actions are certainly well conceived but they claim they are conceived
quite independently. There are, therefore, only three possibilities:<br>
&nbsp;<br>
1.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; There is a leading kernel among
them to which Lynn St Amour necessarily belongs.<br>
2.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; There is an ongoing “manipulation”
by a well planned internet project leadership making I* CEOs think that
they freely decide what someone else has arranged. At this level, and
since this includes taking an political advantage from the Snowden
initiative in a timely manner, it is not credible that NSA/USCC are not
in the loop.<br>
3.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; There is an objective or concluded
cooperation of Lynn St Amour and an internet project leadership that want
to become institutional (as opposed to an &quot;ITU-I&quot;).<br><br>
Reading Lynn St Amour’s resume
(<a href="http://www.internetsociety.org/fr/node/488">
http://www.internetsociety.org/fr/node/488</a>) shows that she is not a
sentimental person one can easily fool. So, the most likely possibility
is the third one: ISOC is acting as a smart front-end. This is a
hypothesis that offers a credible, professional, and trustable
proposition that one can seriously study and negotiate a deal with (as
long as the internet project current leadership [or leading culture] does
not switch from Chomsky’s manipulation strategy nos. 6 and 7 to strategy
no. 5, 4 and 9).<br>
&nbsp;<br><br>
<b>5. Operational conclusion<br><br>
</b>In a first approximation we can reasonably adopt the following
situational model: the USCC is in control; Lynn St Amour is the disclosed
co-pilot. So the decision is for the I*cockpit to make. <br>
&nbsp;<br>
*&nbsp; Either they continue with the architectonical 1972 network BUG,
wherein ARPA/Postel did not implement presentation/security network layer
six, replacing it by network governance control and thereby technically
allowing surveillance. This is strategy # 4, making their &quot;I*
Steering Group&quot; (where folks could participate [John Curan],
“painful and necessary”. It is then likely that the whole system will not
scale and meet the architectonical difficulties that I*CEOs are trying to
avoid.<br>
&nbsp;<br>
*&nbsp; Or Lynn St Amour will publish the technically and politically
credible I*cockpit's 1NET-neutrality-charter the protection of which is
missing in RFC 6852. It is noteworthy that its lack was demonstrated by
the inadequate and insufficient IETF and IAB structural capacity of the
response to my RFC 6852 appeals. As a result they were not permitted to
protect the rights of the civil community in terms of the intelligent
global uses of the Internet, as it should have been in a fair and open
Internet Standards Process (cf. RFC 2026). This is why, in the hope of an
ISOC initiative, I am delaying the ultimate phase of my appeal process:
this would be its most positive end, as Bob Hinden has requested it, if
ISOC made it unnecessary.<br>
&nbsp;<br>
jfc<br><br>
<br>
&nbsp;<br>
</body>
</html>