<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 02/12/13 03:20, Brian E Carpenter
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote cite="mid:529B8C19.5020906@gmail.com" type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">"The 1net initiative should encompass the widest possible stakeholder
community,..."

How is this different from the community that's been invited to join
ISOC since 1992?</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    There are many who will never join ISOC because it is so closely
    tied to the technical community, and advances what has been a very
    narrow view of what is in that community's best interests
    (preservation of its way of doing things, and suspicion and FUD
    about anything else).&nbsp; In practice this means that ISOC has been
    closely aligned with US foreign policy and large US-based
    multinational business interests, and against the expressed
    interests of much of broader civil society and those of developing
    countries.<br>
    <br>
    There hadn't been a lot of introspection about the broader and
    long-term impacts of ISOC's opposition to the Internet governance
    reforms that broader civil society has long been advocating for; at
    least not until the Snowden revelations, and then only belatedly and
    to a limited extent, which even that has raised objections (as
    discussions on this list evidence).<br>
    <br>
    (Note I am talking about global ISOC.&nbsp; There are some excellent ISOC
    chapters whose work is only very loosely linked with whatever global
    ISOC is doing, and indeed who have put forward positions
    inconsistent with those of global ISOC.&nbsp; Good for them.)<br>
    <br>
    So that's why not ISOC.&nbsp; But why 1net instead?&nbsp; Indeed, that remains
    to be demonstrated.<br>
    <br>
    <blockquote cite="mid:529B8C19.5020906@gmail.com" type="cite">
      <pre wrap="">"If successful, it should function in some way as an "inter-sessional"
IGF process."

In order to achieve what? I remain unclear about the *new* objectives
that all this talking is aimed at. What aren't we doing already that
actually needs doing?
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    This is the main problem that I have with Paul's conception of
    1net.&nbsp; If this were to be a substitute for an intersessional IGF
    process, that provides just another excuse to sideline and postpone
    needed and long-overdue reforms to the IGF itself, amongst which are
    the development of intersessional working processes (I have
    personally been calling for this for years, as have others).<br>
    <br>
    Now Paul is one of the individuals at whom I would certainly *not*
    levy the accusation of trying to sabotage the IGF.&nbsp; But there are
    others who are still stubbornly resistant to change, and who will
    seize on this as another excuse to derail the IGF so that policy
    discussions remain close to the technical-community, and don't go
    anywhere useful.&nbsp; In that sense, for such people, the fact that 1net
    won't actually be able to *do* anything about the issues it
    discusses is not a bug but a feature; it is another distraction from
    the work at hand.<br>
    <br>
    So that is the nightmare scenario of what 1net is to me.&nbsp; The most
    positive feasible scenario that I see at this point in time, is that
    1net is more like a neutral ground between the technical community
    with its online fora like the ISOC Internet Policy list, and broader
    civil society with its lists like Best Bits and governance.&nbsp; But
    that's a fairly limited function.<br>
    <br>
    I certainly don't see governments buying into 1net, and to that
    extent, it won't ever be useful as a multi-stakeholder forum in its
    own right, nor does it have the legitimacy to perform any functions
    such as jointly nominating stakeholders to high-level processes,
    etc.<br>
    <br>
    <div class="moz-signature">-- <br>
      <p style="font-size:9.0pt;color:black"><b>Dr Jeremy Malcolm<br>
          Senior Policy Officer<br>
          Consumers International | the global campaigning voice for
          consumers</b><br>
        Office for Asia-Pacific and the Middle East<br>
        Lot 5-1 Wisma WIM, 7 Jalan Abang Haji Openg, TTDI, 60000 Kuala
        Lumpur, Malaysia<br>
        Tel: +60 3 7726 1599</p>
      <!--<p style="font-size:9.0pt;color:black"><b>Your rights, our mission &ndash; download CI's Strategy 2015:</b> <a href="http://consint.info/RightsMission">http://consint.info/RightsMission</a></p>-->
      <p style="font-size:9.0pt;color:black">Explore our new Resource
        Zone - the global consumer movement knowledge hub | <a
href="http://www.consumersinternational.org/news-and-media/resource-zone">http://www.consumersinternational.org/news-and-media/resource-zone</a></p>
      <p style="font-size:9.0pt;color:black">@Consumers_Int | <a
          href="http://www.consumersinternational.org">www.consumersinternational.org</a>
        | <a href="http://www.facebook.com/consumersinternational">www.facebook.com/consumersinternational</a></p>
      <p style="font-size:8.0pt;color:#999999">Read our <a
          href="http://www.consumersinternational.org/email-confidentiality"
          target="_blank">email confidentiality notice</a>. Don't print
        this email unless necessary.</p>
      <p><strong><span style="color:red;">WARNING</span></strong><span
          style="color:black;">: This email has not been encrypted. You
          are strongly recommended to enable PGP or S/MIME encryption at
          your end. For instructions, see <a href="http://jere.my/l/8m">http://jere.my/l/8m</a>.</span></p>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>